Belgian Independance Day

Come and Join Us for a Taste of Belgian Independance
Large Format Bottles will be open as the evening progresses.

BELGIAN INDEPENDANCE DAY

History

At the Congress of Vienna, in 1815, Belgium (The Southern Netherlands) and the Northern Netherlands (Holland) were united to form one State. This new state was ruled by King William I. Although his policy was beneficial to the Belgian bourgeoisie, there was protest. The Catholics objected against the interference of the protestant king in clerical matters. The Liberals demanded more freedom. In 1828 Catholics and Liberals drew up a concerted program of demands. The association between Catholics and Liberals was called unionism.

After a series of incidents, the revolution erupted in Brussels in 1830. William I sent in his troops, but they were expelled on September 27th, 1830. The rebels received support from volunteers outside the city. Following this rising Belgium separated from the Northern Netherlands. A provisional government declared independence on October 4th, 1830. On November 3th of the same year, a National Congress was elected by an electorate of 30,000 men, who paid a given level of taxes or who had special qualifications. On February 7th, 1831 the national congress adopted a constitution which, for its time, was very progressive

After Belgium asserted its independence from the Netherlands on 4 October 1830, the Belgian National Congress considered several candidates and eventually asked Leopold to become King of the newly-formed country. He was elected on 4 June and accepted and became
“King of the Belgians” on 26 June 1831. He swore allegiance to the constitution in front of the Saint Jacob’s Church at Coudenbergh Place in Brussels on 21 July 1831. This day became the Belgian national holiday.

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